THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE CHEAKAMUS RIVER DOWNSTREAM OF THE DAISY LAKE DAM

Three reaches of the Cheakamus River were subject to aerial photogaphy analysis in order to study the effects of impoundment on downstream geomorphology over time. Aerial photography spanning a period of 49 years following the construction of the Daisy Lake Dam in 1957 was used to show river incision and channelization, the development of islands in coarse bed materials, and the division of flows while subjecting the Cheakamus’ pre-impoundment banks to further erosion. Also, this examination highlights difficulties relevant to identifying bankfull width by way of aerial imagery in the presence of past alluvial deposits and stream entrenchment.


CONCEPTUALIZING STREAM ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION:
STREAM ECOSYSTEM NETWORK
(OR S.E.N.)

Beginning with an overview of conventional restoration practices, this work goes on to examine the development and use of a Stream Ecosystem Network, an interactive systems-thinking tool that promotes a compehensive understanding of ecosystem processes to its user. As such, the paper discusses the re-integration of natural processes in restoration and the benefits of utilizing visualization throughout project development. To note: the Stream Ecosystem Network is an ongoing project -- the database of interactions is kept private, however, the interface is hosted on this site (see the menu bar).


FOREST SERVICE ROADS & THE RESTORATION OF SALMON SPAWNING HABITAT

Primary concerns crucial to spawning bed conservation and restoration are identified, including: soil erosion and fine particle deposition, the effects of abiotic stream variables, and an altered stream hydrological regime. This paper communicates the need and provides support for a more refined and process-based approach to management practices and regulation development. Adarshana Thapa and Ellen Zhang, Master of Land and Water Systems graduate students, contributed to this work.